Tagged: Player of the Week

McCann’s Blast Beats Rays As Yankees Claim First

GAME 20

YANKEES 4, RAYS 1

Brian McCann signed with the New York Yankees because Yankee Stadium was perfectly suited to his swing. He entered play on Monday having hit 20 of his 24 home runs with the Yankees at home.

Make it 21 out of 25.

McCann connected for a one-out solo shot into the second deck in right-field to break a 1-1 tie and New York went on to end Tampa Bay’s five-game winning streak to take sole possession of first place in the American League East.

McCann’s second home run of the season came off right-hander Brandon Gomes (0-1) and was immediately followed by a double by Carlos Beltran. One out later, Stephen Drew doubled off left-hander Everett Teaford for an RBI double that gave the Yankees a 3-1 lead.

Justin Wilson (1-0) relieved starter Adam Warren in the sixth inning and pitched an inning to get credit for the victory.

As it did the previous night against the Mets, the Yankees bullpen consisting of Wilson, David Carpenter, Dellin Betances and Andrew Miller shut down the Rays on one hit and one walk and four strikeouts over the final 3 1/3 innings.

The Yankees bullpen came into the game in second place in the America League in ERA and first in strikeouts.

Miller pitched the final inning to earn his eighth save in as many opportunities. He is the first Yankees pitcher to have recorded eight saves in the team’s first 20 games.

The Yankees’ two-run sixth broke up a pitcher’s duel between Warren and Rays right-hander Nathan Karns.

Karns shut out the Yankees on just two hits in the first four innings and recorded the first two outs in the fifth before walking Drew. Didi Gregorius followed with an infield single and Jacoby Ellsbury chased Karns by fighting through a eight-pitch at-bat to draw a walk that loaded the bases.

Rays manager Kevin Cash then brought in Gomes and the veteran reliever walked Brett Gardner on a 3-2 pitch to give the Yankees a 1-0 lead.

However, the Rays fought back in the sixth inning when David DeJesus led off with a single, advanced to second on a wild pitch and took third on a flyout by Steven Souza Jr.

With the infield drawn in, Asdrubal Cabrera hit a ground ball to Drew at second base. Drew fired a one-hop throw to McCann at home but DeJesus touched the plate before McCann could apply the tag to tie the game at 1-1.

Some curious strategy by Cash allowed the Yankees to add a run in the eighth inning off a noticeably struggling Teaford.

McCann led off with a single and, two outs later, Drew singled to right. Then Gregorius drew a walk to load the bases. As the inning unfolded, Cash did not have anyone warming up in the Rays bullpen.

It proved costly because Teaford then hit Ellsbury with a 1-1 pitch to force in another run.

The Yankees came into the game tied with the Rays at 11-8. Now they are 12-8 and the Rays fell to 11-9.

PINSTRIPE POSITIVES

  • McCann entered the contest hitting .232 and ended up going 2-for-4 with a home run, two runs scored and an RBI. McCann also showed that he is willing to hit against the overshift that opponents have been using against him. Leading off the eighth, he first attempted to bunt the ball towards third base and ended up hitting a single that way on the next pitch for a single.
  • Warren actually pitched his best game of the season and it is unfortunate he could not stay in long enough to have earned the victory. Warren yielded just one run on five hits and no walks and he struck out six in 5 2/3 innings. He is now 1-1 with a 4.35 ERA after four starts. Warren had absolutely no command issues and pitched out of a tough jam in the first when Souza hit a one-out single and Cabrera followed with a bloop ground-rule double. Warren fanned Evan Longoria, who entered the game on a 7-for-7 hitting streak, and then retired James Loney on a groundout to end the threat.
  • The Yankees bullpen is simply one of the best collections of power arms the Yankees have had. Wilson, Carpenter, Betances and Miller all throw in the mid-90s or better and opposing teams are quickly learning they will lose if they do not have the lead by the sixth inning. Betances and Miller are quickly making Yankee fans see there has been no dropoff after the retirement of Mariano Rivera and the free-agent departure of David Robertson.

NAGGING NEGATIVES

I can’t complain about anything when the team gets good pitching and some timely hitting. They also scored two runs without having to swing the bat which proves they are finding all kinds of ways to win games. It looks as if all those so-called experts who were predicting gloom for the Yankees this season were dreadfully wrong.

BOMBER BANTER

Mark Teixeira was named the American League Player of the Week on Monday. Teixeira, 34, was 8-for-24 (.333) with five homers and 10 RBIs in his past seven games. His hot hitting fueled the Yankees to a 5-2 record for the week. It was the fifth time Teixeira has won the award.  . . .  Ellsbury returned the lineup on Monday after missing Sunday’s game against the Mets with a tightness in his right hip. Ellsbury was 1-for-3 with a walk and was hit by a pitch. He also stole a base and drove in a run.

ON DECK

The Yankees, who are 4-0 against the Rays this season, will look to continue their matter over them on Tuesday.

The Yankees will call up right-hander Chase Whitley from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre to allow right-hander Masahiro Tanaka to have an extra day of rest while the Yankees are in the middle of playing 30 games in 31 days. Whitley, 25, is 2-0 with a 2.12 ERA in three starts with the RailRiders.

The Rays will throw right-hander Jake Odorizzi (2-1, 1.65 ERA). Odorizzi’s lone loss came at the hands of the Yankees on April 18 at Tropicana Field. In his last start he gave up one run on three hits and three walks with three strikeouts in 6 2/3 innings of a no decision against the Boston Red Sox on Thursday.

Game-time will be 7:05 p.m. EDT and the game will be broadcast nationally by the MLB Network and locally by the YES Network.

 

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Ten-aka! Righty Fans 10 As Yankees Blank Cubs

GAME 15

YANKEES 3, CUBS 0

There were a lot of critics who said that Masahiro Tanaka would find pitching in the United States more challenging because the hitters are so much better. They claimed Tanaka would have to prove he could pitch here.

After Wednesday’s performance at Yankee Stadium against the Cubs, what more proof do those critics need?

Tanaka (2-0) allowed only two bunt singles and struck out 10  en route to eight shutout innings as New York took the first game of a day-night doubleheader by beating Chicago in front of a paid crowd of 36,569.

Carlos Beltran, who was named the American League Player of the Week for last week, gave Tanaka all the run support he really needed by launching his fourth home run of the season into the right-field bleachers with one out in the first inning off right-hander Jason Hammel (2-1).

The Yankees added a single run in the fourth inning after loading the bases with one out and Dean Anna hit a sacrifice fly that scored Brian McCann. They added another run in fifth inning thanks to some strategic thinking by manager Joe Girardi.

With Brett Gardner on third and one out, Jacoby Ellsbury’s bat came in contact with Cubs catcher John Baker’s glove on a swing in what would have been catcher’s interference. Ellsbury would have been awarded first base but Gardner would have had to remain at third.

However, as Hammel tagged out Ellsbury, Gardner touched home plate. Girardi was given the choice by the umpires to take the catcher’s interference our accept the result of play. Girardi wisely chose the result of the play to give the Yankees a 3-0 lead.

Hammel did not pitch bad but he was simply out-pitched. He gave up three runs on five hits and three walks while he fanned five over seven innings of work.

After Tanaka gave up a video-review bunt single to Junior Lake with one out in the second inning, he retired the next 14 batters  –  striking out seven of them  –  until Anthony Rizzo led off the seventh inning with a bunt single.

The Japanese right-hander only walked one batter and he became the first Yankees’ pitcher to strike out 28 batters in his first three games, breaking Al Leiter’s record of 25 set in 1987.

Shawn Kelley pitched a scoreless ninth to record hid fourth save in as many chances this season.

With the Yankees’ first shutout of the season, they improved their season record to 8-6. The Cubs dropped to 4-9.

PINSTRIPE POSITIVES

  • Tanaka was in total command throughout his 107-pitch outing despite the chilly 43-degree temperatures in the Bronx. The fact that the Cubs could only muster two bunt hits just highlights his dominance. He is the first Yankee pitcher to pitch eight shutout innings while striking out at least 10 batters and giving up two or fewer hits since Randy Johnson did it on on July 26, 2005 against the Boston Red Sox.
  • Beltran continued his hot hitting by going 1-for-3 with a walk. Since April 7, Beltran is 12-for-29 (.414) with four home runs and seven RBIs. The Yankees signed the 36-year-old veteran outfielder to be a force in the middle of the lineup and he is providing just that.
  • Give Kelley credit as the fill-in closer. With Mariano Rivera retired and David Robertson the disabled list, Kelley has been perfect in the ninth inning so far. He is 0-1 with a 2.45 ERA and six strikeouts in 7 1/3 innings. He is anchoring a bullpen that has been much better than most experts thought.

NAGGING NEGATIVES

Nothing negative here. The Yankees got an early lead and added to it while Tanaka was mowing down Cubs.

The features Bomber Banter and On Deck will be included in the next post.

 

Cano’s Contract Push May Lead To Breakout Year

Happy New Year to all my fellow fans. I recently posted a three-part series looking at the Yankees from their pitching, their bullpen and starting lineup. Now I intend to zero in on a look at them from a position-by-position standpoint. With spring training mere weeks away it seems an appropriate time to do this. Enjoy!

 SECOND BASE – ROBINSON CANO (33 HRs, 99 RBIs, .313 BA)

I remember very well a day before a spring training game in 2005 seeing this tall, thin Yankee rookie swatting line drives all over the field in batting practice. The swing was smooth and effortless while the ball jumped off his bat.

I asked someone about this kid Robinson Cano and what I heard back impressed me. “Cano is just a colt now. But very soon he will be a thoroughbred,” he said.

Eight years later his words ring true. Cano has grown up before our very eyes and now he is the best player in pinstripes. He is no longer a boy among men. He is the man the team revolves around.

Sadly, this very well could be Cano’s last season with the Yankees. The team is under a strict edict from owner Hal Steinbrenner to reduce payroll to $189 million by 2014 and Cano can become a free agent after this season.

After a season in which he set a career high in home runs and hit above .300 for the seventh time in his nine major-league seasons and won his second Gold Glove and fourth Silver Slugger awards it is a pretty sure bet that Cano would command a lot of money on the open market. Add the fact his agent is Scott Boras and you can, pardon the pun, bank on it.

The Yankees are going to have to be mighty creative to find the dollars to keep Cano, 30. But they likely will make every attempt to open the vault wide enough to keep their best player. It would be a good thing, too.

With Alex Rodriguez saddled with a string of injuries the real foundation of the team’s growth is Cano. Second basemen who can hit home runs, drive in runs and hit above .300 are not exactly plentiful. Cano is simply the best second baseman in baseball and there is no one in the Yankee organization, let alone any organization, that can really replace him.

So you would think it would be wise for Yankee fans during spring training to watch Cano carefully because it could be the last time they see him. One problem with that: Cano is committed to play his native Dominican Republic in the World Baseball Classic.

So the Yankees likely will not get Cano back until the latter stages of March.

Cano’s 2012 season was marked by some milestones. But it was hardly the banner season the Yankees expected from him.

Cano struggled in two major areas: (1) In the first half of the season Cano was woefully inept at driving in runners in scoring position. That is why he failed to drive in more than 100 runs. (2) He suddenly ran into trouble hitting left-handers. He hit just .239 against them while he pounded right-handers at a .357 clip.

Cano actually rescued his season with an incredible stretch of games in late September. After Sept. 1, Cano hit six home runs and drove in 24 runs while batting .348. The Yankees would appreciate more consistency from Cano and they hope he can return to bashing left-hand pitching as he did in throughout his career up until last season.

Given that this is Cano’s contract season and given his past track record, this could be the breakout season everyone has been predicting for him. With a bit more discipline at the plate Cano could very well win a batting title, hit 30-plus home runs and drive in more than 120 runs.

Cano’s big failing at the plate has been a product of his immense talent. Cano can simply put a swing on any pitch in or out of the strike zone. So pitchers lure him with a lot of breaking pitches out of the strike zone and then pound him with hard stuff inside to tie up his swing.

Cano obliges them by swinging at less than optimum pitches and he gets himself out. If Cano ever lays off pitches out of the strike zone consistently throughout a season he might very well hit .340. He is just that good.

Over the years, Cano has been saddled with the tag “lazy.”

That is a product of his nonchalant style of play. But last season there were times that Cano made outs on the bases he should not have made. Here is something that might surprise you: Cano is simply a terrible base-runner and he always has been.

Some players have good instincts on the bases like Derek Jeter and some players like Cano don’t. Cano never was called upon to bunt or steal bases throughout his minor-league career because he was such a productive hitter. It has just carried over to the major leagues.

He is not a fast runner and he just never worked on base-running much because he never had to really worry about it. Last season it was obvious.

Cano attempted five steals last season and was succcessful three times. In his career he has stolen 31 bases but he been thrown out 27. Rickey Henderson he is not!

But Cano was able to score 105 runs, the fourth season in a row he has topped the century mark in runs scored. So as long as the Yankees do not have him running wild on the bases, Cano’ s weakness will not hurt the team.

The “lazy” tag also has had a serious effect on how Cano’s fielding has been judged. Early in his career, Cano did make careless errors by trying to look cool fielding routine grounders. Since then he has grown into an exceptional fielder who should have won the last six Gold Gloves instead of just two.

Cano simply has more range than second baseman in baseball. That applies to ground balls and pop flies. No one can range as far into the outfield to catch pops and few can master the play to his right on grounders better than Cano.

His arm is exceptionally great for a second baseman and Cano does not credit for being accurate with it also. Roberto Alomar may have set the standard for fielding during his career but Cano is shattering that standard and setting one of his own.

The other thing that sets Cano apart is his turn of the double play. In the last six seasons, Cano has turned no less than 92 double plays and no one can turn and flip to first better than he can. In doing all that work in the field last season, Cano committed only six errors. Wow!

That 2012 Gold Glove award was well deserved.

Another Cano attribute throughout his career is his durability despite playing a middle infield spot. In his last six seasons, Cano has never played less than 159 games. He played in 161 games last season.

When you add it all up you get one very exceptional player and one who is destined to be a very rich one come the 2014 season.

Behind Cano last season was Jayson Nix, not that he was needed much.

Nix, 30, made only five starts at second and he did not commit an error there. Nix hit .243 with four home runs and 18 RBIs in 74 games with the Yankees after being recalled on May 8 to replace Eduardo Nunez as the Yankees’ backup middle infielder.

Nix obviously will never match Cano with his bat or his glove. The Yankees just ask him to play his solid, nonflashy game and not make mistakes. Nix does that very well and he will get a chance to do it again in 2013.

Though he was designated for assignment on Nov. 30 after reliever Mariano Rivera was re-signed, Nix accepted assignment to Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre and he will compete with Nunez for the backup middle infield spot this spring.

Nunez, 25, won the backup infielder job over the recently released Ramiro Pena in 2011 but promptly lost early in 2012 season when he began treating ground balls like hand grenades. Nunez made so many sloppy fielding errors that he was dispatched to Scranton to work on exclusively playing shortstop.

He enters camp in 2013 with some very positive things in his favor. Nunez can hit (his career batting average is .272) and he can run (38 steals in 46 career attempts). The right-hand hitter also could be valuable as a replacement to Andruw Jones as a platoon designated hitter.

But Nunez likely will get most of his work in spring training at shortstop replacing Jeter, who is in the process of rehabbing after surgery on a fractured left ankle he suffered in the first game of the American League Championship Series against the Detroit Tigers.

Jeter’s rehab is expected to run through part of the exhibition schedule and it is unclear if he will be ready to start for the Yankees on Opening Day. So Nunez will be of more value at shortstop, which is his natural position.

Nunez did make one start at second base last season and characteristically he committed an error there. It is good thing Cano is durable.

The Yankees will have a chance in Cano’s absence this spring to look at a pair of young second basemen who are on the 40-man roster, David Adams and Corban Joseph.

Adams, 25, hit .306 with eight home runs and 48 RBIs in 86 games at Double-A Trenton. He has carried that into the Arizona Fall League, where he is hitting .286 with three home runs and 15 RBIs and was named Player of the Week in the fifth week of the season.

Adams, a third-round pick of the Yankees in 2008 out of the University of Virginia, has been hobbled most of his minor-league career with a serious ankle injury. But he is healthy now and he is hoping to regain his prospect status.

Joseph, 24, hit a combined .276 with 15 home runs and 62 RBIs in 131 games at Trenton and Scranton.

Selected in the fourth round of the 2008 draft out of Franklin (TN) High School, Joseph has more power than Adams and he has the advantage of passing Adams to Scranton while being a year younger.

Neither player looks to be threats to Cano at all, obviously. But they will get a chance to develop just in case Cano departs in 2014.

Further down the line the Yankees have Jose Pirela, 23, and Angelo Gumbs, 20.

Pirela hit .293 with eight home runs and 33 RBIs in 82 games at Trenton. The Venezuela native is being looked upon as a potential middle infield backup utility infielder with a good line-drive bat but he lacks speed.

Gumbs, the team’s No. 8 prospect, was signed as a shortstop but has played second base in his two years in the minors. He hit .272 with seven home runs, 36 RBIs and 26 stolen bases at Class-A Charleston (SC) in the South Atlantic League. An elbow injury ended his season in June.

Gumbs plays an aggressive style and shows that he has a good bat, which makes him a young player worth watching in 2013.

But Gumbs is a long way away from making the majors and Cano simply is the industry standard at his position. It also looks like he will be that standard for some years to come.

There is no doubt Cano will be motivated to produce in 2013 and he could have that monster season for which everybody has been waiting. The Yankees will need that from him in a season that appears the team will be lacking some power and a team that will be minus Rodriguez for much of the season.

The Yankees simply will go as far as Cano can possibly carry them this season.

NEXT: First Base