Tagged: Dallas

Tex’s Six RBIs Blow Away Chisox in Windy City

GAME 102

YANKEES 13, WHITE SOX 6

After the Yankees landed in Chicago at 4 a.m. after their long flight from Dallas most all of the players were pretty tired after a grueling four-game series in the Texas heat. But Mark Teixeira was not one of those players because he was rested on Thursday.

He definitely was wide awake playing against the White Sox on Friday at U.S. Cellular Field.

Teixeira blasted a pair of homers, including his 10th career grand slam, and drove in six runs to lead New York to a rout of Chicago and allow right-hander Nathan Eovaldi to notch his 11th victory of the season.

The Yankees jumped on rookie left-hander Carlos Rodon (4-4) for eight runs in three-plus innings and they scored five runs and sent 10 men to the plate in both the second and fourth innings to post an early 11-2 lead.

Eovaldi (11-2), who has been getting 7.09 runs of a support per start, was able to pitch into the sixth inning to earn his sixth consecutive victory over his past eight starts to lead the Yankees starters in wins.

Eovaldi yielded three runs on seven hits and three walks with five strikeouts over 5 2/3 innings.

The Yankees scored a single run in the first on a two-out double by Alex Rodriguez. Teixeira then drew a walk and Carlos Beltran followed with an RBI double.

They added five runs in the second keyed by a two-out RBI single from Rodriguez and Teixeira’s grand slam home run to center.

The White Sox drew to within four runs in the third inning on a one-out single by Adam Eaton and two-out, two-run home run by Jose Abreu, his 18th of the season.

But the Yankees chased Rodon and put the game away in the fourth starting with a leadoff double by Chris Young and Young later scored on a pair of wild pitches by Rodon with Rodriguez at the plate.

Rodriguez ended up drawing a four-pitch walk and White Sox manager Robin Ventura replaced Rodon with right-hander Matt Albers.

Teixeira then greeted the veteran right-hander by blasting a 2-2 pitch into center-field for his second home run of the evening and his 28th of the season.

With the home run Teixeira also became the Major League leader among switch-hitters who have hit home runs from both sides of the plate in a game. It was the 14th time the 35-year-old first baseman had done it to pass former teammate Nick Swisher, who was tied with Teixeira at 13.

The Yankees then reloaded the bases on Albers and Brendan Ryan stroked an RBI single and Didi Gregorius followed with a sacrifice fly to make it 11-2.

Rodon was charged with a career-high eight runs on seven hits and four walks with four strikeouts. He also threw three wild pitches in what also was the shortest outing of his career.

The Yankees added single runs in the fifth and sixth innings on RBI singles by Chase Headley and Jacoby Ellsbury, respectively, as each member of the Yankees starting lineup collected at least one hit.

In their past two victories the Yankees have outscored their opposition 32-10 and rapped out a total of 37 hits.

The Yankees have now won a Major-League-best 17 games after the All-Star break and their overall record improved to 58-44.

They lead the second-place Baltimore Orioles and Toronto Blue Jays by six games in the American League East. The White Sox dropped to 49-52.

PINSTRIPE POSITIVES

  • It took this season to remind Yankee fans how valuable Teixeira was before injuries ruined the past two seasons of his career. Teixeira was 3-for-4 with a double, two home runs, two walks, two runs scored and six RBIs. Teixeira is now batting .269 with 28 homers (tied for third in the American League) and 73 RBIs (tied for first in the A.L.). You can’t do much better than what he has done, especially when you factor in his defense at first base (only two errors).
  • Teixeira was batting fourth between Rodriguez and Beltran. Those 3-4-5 hitters combined to go an unbelievable 8-for-10 with five walks, seven runs scored and eight RBIs. Rodriguez was 2-for-2 with three walks, four runs scored and one RBI. Beltran was 3-for-4 with a single and two doubles, a run scored and one RBI.
  • Ryan, 33, has been amazing ever since he was inserted as the starting second baseman against left-handers. On Friday, the career .234 hitter was 3-for-6 including a double and an RBI. In his past three starts, Ryan is 6-for-16 (.375) and he has driven in four runs. The hot streak will not last but Ryan’s bat is helping lengthen the Yankees’ lineup along with Headley and Gregorius.

NAGGING NEGATIVES

  • The White Sox obviously used the the same game plan all teams use against Eovaldi by shortening their swings in order to foul off multiple pitches to drive up his pitch count. It has not worked in beating him. But it has kept him from pitching six innings in 13 of his 20 starts. It took Eovaldi 117 pitches to make it through 5 2/3 innings and the Yankees would prefer he go deeper into games.

BOMBER BANTER

Outfielder Dustin Ackley made his debut with the Yankees on Friday after being acquired in a trade-deadline deal with the Seattle Mariners for right-hander Jose Ramirez and outfielder Ramon Flores. Ackley, 27, pinch-hit for Beltran in the seventh inning and played left-field. He ended up going 0-for-2. Ackley will fill the role that was held by Garrett Jones, who was designated for assignment on Friday. He will backup Teixeira at first base and play some outfield. He is hitting .213 with six homers and 19 RBIs. Though Ackley primarily was a second baseman early in his career, he likely will not play there much because he only played one game there in the past two seasons.  . . .  The Yankees announced on Friday that the team’s No. 1 prospect, right-hander Luis Severino, will make his Major-League debut as a starter next week in the Boston Red Sox series at Yankee Stadium. Severino, 21, is 7-0 with a 1.91 ERA in 11 starts at Triple-A Scranton Wilkes-Barre. He is coming off a career-high 10-strikeout performance while pitching one-hit ball over six innings on Wednesday for the RailRiders. Severino will take the place of right-hander Michael Pineda, who was placed in the 15-day disabled list with a right forearm flexor strain. General manager Brian Cashman said that Severino could get a extended look.

ON DECK

The Yankees can clinch a series victory if they are able to defeat the White Sox in the second game of their weekend set on Saturday.

Right-hander Bryan Mitchell (0-0, 2.89 ERA) will make his second career Major-League start and his first of the season. Mitchell, 24, is replacing Pineda for this start after being called up from Scranton on Thursday. Mitchell was 5-5 with a 3.12 ERA in 15 starts for the RailRiders this season.

The White Sox will counter with left-hander John Danks (5-8, 4.87 ERA). Danks, 30, is coming a disastrous outing in which he gave up six runs on nine hits and one walk in 4 1/3 innings to the Red Sox. He is 2-3 in his career against the Yankees.

Game-time will be 7:10 p.m. EDT and the game will be broadcast by WPIX.

 

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Cashman Leaves Without Deals But Hopes Alive

MLB WINTER MEETINGS

DAY FOUR – FAREWELL

Pardon me for having a vision of Yankees general manager Brian Cashman ending up in a long, unproductive discussion with a Hotel Anatole bellhop on the best way to turn in his room key. It has just been the way it has gone for Cashman since he arrived on Monday: Long and unproductive.

But to be fair to Cashman, it was exactly what he predicted would happen before he ever stepped foot in the hotel lobby.

While the Miami Marlins were shopping at Tiffany’s the Yankees were checking the clearance racks at JC Penney’s.

The Yankees came into the MLB Winter Meetings with a very short shopping list of parts that could make a team that won 97 games last season just a bit better. The starting lineup remains the same, the Yankees have five starting pitchers with which they can start the season, they boast a deep bullpen and have just a few spots to fill on the bench – though the Yankees would even like to bring back veterans Eric Chavez and Andruw Jones.

So the Yankees used these meetings to kick the tires on potential trades for a starting pitcher, they won the right to negotiate with a Japanese infielder and they selected two players in the Rule 5 draft on Thursday that could have an impact on their bullpen this spring.

The moves won’t spur much of a surge of season ticket sales but Cashman hopes the seeds sown here will lead to something more fruitful down the road.

First, let’s look at the two additions to the pitching staff:

The Kansas City Royals used the fifth pick in the draft to select left-handed reliever Cesar Cabral from the Red Sox and then traded him to the Yankees for cash considerations. Cabral, 22, will be given a look this spring as a potential second left-hander in the bullpen to go along with Boone Logan.

Cabral was 3-4 with a 2.95 ERA in 36 combined appearances with Class A Salem and Double-A Portland last season. He struck out 70 batters in 55 innings and Cashman likes his 94-mph velocity and the fact he can get left-handers out consistently.

Cabral was selected in the 2010 Rule 5 draft by the Rays but later was returned to the Red Sox.

With the 29th pick in the draft, the Yankees selected right-handed starter Brad Meyers from the Washington Nationals.

Meyers, 26, was a combined 9-7 with a 3.18 ERA in 25 games (24 starts) in stops at Class A Salem, Double-A Harrisburg and Triple-A Syracuse last season. He struck out 116 batters in 132 2/3 innings and walked just 15. In 2009, the 6-foot-5 hurler was named the Nationals’ Minor-League Pitcher of the Year.

Though Meyers is a starting pitcher, the Yankees will look at Meyers as a potential long reliever because the team intends to use Hector Noesi as a starter this season.

The Yankees entered the draft with 39 players on their 40-man roster. The addition of Cabral and Meyers meant that the Yankees had to release 26-year-old outfielder Greg Golson. Golson hit .195 with no home runs and two RBis in 40 games over four seasons with the Phillies, Rangers and the Yankees.

The Yankees might add some depth to their bench by obtaining the right to sign 29-year-old infielder Hiroyuki Nakajima of the Seibu Lions in Japan. Nakajima is primarily a shortstop but he also can play second and third base. He hit .314 with 20 home runs and 93 RBIs in 130 games in Japan last season.

The Yankees posted a bid of $2 million for Nakajima and now the Yankees have until Jan. 6 to reach contract agreement or the $2 million fee is returned to them.

The Yankees are saying Nakajima would give the Yankees some options if Chavez does not re-sign. But it also gives the Yankees the option of trading Eduardo Nunez for a starting pitcher because the Yankees also have backup infielder Ramiro Pena on the 40-man roster.

As for the search for starting pitching, Cashman made it clear he believed that clubs were not going to overpay for free-agent pitchers such as C.J. Wilson, Edwin Jackson, Mark Buerhle and Roy Oswalt. So Cashman has been seeking out possible trades for pitchers like John Danks of the White Sox, Matt Garza of the Cubs, Jair Jurrgens of the Braves and Gio Gonzalez of the Athletics.

Late Wednesday, the Yankees even inquired about Jonathan Niese of the Mets.

The problems Cashman has had in making a potential deal for any of these pitchers is teams are asking for the Yankees’ best prospects in catcher Jesus Montero, pitchers Dellin Betances and Manny Banuelos and veterans like Brett Gardner, Ivan Nova, David Robertson and Phil Hughes in return. These are players Cashman does not want to trade.

But with the free-agent signing season in full swing, there is likely to be teams with changing circumstances, agents who might have to lower their price for some free agents and trade demands get lowered as spring training approaches. Cashman sees this period in January as an window of opportunity that may allow the Yankees to get a No. 2 or No. 3 starter via trade or free agency.

Oh, and do not buy the Cashman party line about his mild interest in Japanese ace right-hander Yu Darvish.

The Yankees are not tipping their hand but it is a pretty good bet that Cashman and the Yankees might go all out to win the bidding when Darvish is posted. Though the posting fee will easily top the $50 million the Boston Red Sox ponied up for Daisuke Matzusaka, that posting fee does count against the team salary level.

Darvish, 25, is also young enough that the Yankees could structure a graduated long-term contract worth $120 million over eight years that could be worth $10 million the first year. That is half of the $20 million C.J. Wilson is seeking in a six-year deal. Darvish is six years younger and the Yankees believe he has a much higher ceiling than the 31-year-old Wilson.

So do not write off Cashman and the Yankees this winter based on their relative lack of activity in the winter meetings. The hares may have a nice head start for now but the tortoises are going to be coming on strong in January. Cashman just hopes that the Yankees are one of those tortoises.

 

Yankees Face Obstacles To Unloading Burnett

MLB WINTER MEETINGS

DAY THREE

Though the New York Yankees have not created any shockwaves at the Hotel Anatole in Dallas in baseball’s annual Winter Meetings they are beginning to send out some tremors of where they are heading in 2012.

As manager Joe Girardi arrived in Dallas on Tuesday to join general manager Brian Cashman, it has become very obvious that the Yankees want to divest themselves of enigmatic right-hander A.J. Burnett. This confirms what I had posted on Nov. 11 when the Yankees chose to re-sign veteran right-hander Freddy Garcia.

The Garcia signing gave the Yankees five starting pitchers available to them in 2012, including Burnett, Garcia, Ivan Nova, Phil Hughes and the ace CC Sabathia, who signed a lucrative extension rather than opt out of his contract. With Cashman testing the pulse of other clubs for trades of starting pitchers such as John Danks, Gio Gonzalez, Matt Garza and Jair Jurrgens and looking at free agents such as Mark Buerhle, Roy Oswalt and Hiroki Kuroda it seems obvious the Yankees are not completely satisfied with those five starters.

The Yankees do have six pitchers who are 24 years old or less in the minor-league system who can help next season, including Hector Noesi and the Yankees’ top two young pitching prospects in Dellin Betances and Manny Banuelos.

But it seems obvious the Yankees are looking to make a deal to add a potential No. 2 or No. 3 starter to allow themselves the luxury of being able to dump Burnett and the two years on his contract that will pay him $33 million. The Yankees have offered to pay $8 million of that contract if there is any team interested in the 34-year-old right-hander, according to the New York Post.

But, at this point, there have been no takers. Burnett was 11-11 with a 5.15 ERA in 32 starts last season.

Moving Burnett does have some obstacles. For one, Burnett does have a partial no-trade clause which limits the Yankees’ potential trade partners. A second issue is that the Yankees likely would like to have the deal for  that additional No. 2 or No. 3 starter in place before making a trade shipping Burnett to another team. Finally, the Yankees might to have to sweeten any potential deal for Burnett by offering to pay more than the roughly 25% percent they are offering. A fairer number may be closer to 50% if they truly want to be rid of Burnett.

Burnett does have value to the Yankees, according to Cashman, because he is capable of pitching 200 innings. However, the issue has never been the innings Burnett can pitch; it has been the quality of those innings. Burnett has logged two consecutive seasons with ERAs over 5.00 and he is always among the league leaders in wild pitches and batters hit by pitch. His lack of control does not make him a good option to shift to the bullpen. So Burnett limits the Yankees’ choices.

Despite the fact that Burnett did pitch well in Game 4 of the American League Division Series with Detroit, Yankee fans have pretty much gotten tired of his act on the mound and seek a more stable pitcher in the rotation. Cashman obviously agrees but he also knows it could be difficult to unload Burnett this winter.

Meanwhile, the Yankees did have one bit of news on Wednesday.

The Yankees have won the rights to negotiate with Japanese shortstop Hiroyuki Nakajima, a source confirmed.

Nakajima, 29, was a memeber of the Seibu Lions and is a career .300 hitter since his debut in 2002. The right-handed hitting Nakajima would be a potential backup to Derek Jeter.

According to CBSSports.com the Yankees winning bid to the rights to sign Nakajima was $2 million. Nakajima batted .314 with 20 home runs, 93 RBIs and 15 stolen bases in 130 games with the Lions this season.

You can also read this potential signing as another clue as to where the Yankees might be headed in 2012.

Last season, Eduardo Nunez hit .265 with five home runs, 30 RBIs and 22 stolen bases in 112 games mostly as backup at shortstop, second base and third base. At age 24, Nunez has his future progress with the Yankees blocked by Jeter, Robinson Cano and Alex Rodriguez.

The Mariners sought Nunez (in addition to Nova and Jesus Montero) in a trade for Cliff Lee in July 2010, which Cashman rejected because he did not want to part with Nunez. Teams this winter have inquired about his availability in trade and Cashman would the flexibility to deal Nunez once the Yankees are able to sign Nakajima.

The Yankees also have reserve infielder Ramiro Pena on the roster. Pena lost the reserve infielder spot to Nunez in spring training last season but did hit .100 with one home run and four RBIs in 23 games with the Yankees in 2011. Though Nunez is the better athlete, has better speed and a better bat, Pena is much more reliable in the field and he is the team’s best bunter.

So if the Yankees do sign Nakajima and they have Pena on the roster it is pretty clear the Yankees would be willing to trade Nunez as part of a package to obtain a starting pitcher. This is no real secret but the Nakajima signing makes it obvious the Yankees are willing to go through with the move if the Yankees can get a good starting pitcher in return.

The Nakajima bid also may be revealing one other even more important point. The Yankees might be setting the stage for a bid for Japanese pitching star Yu Darvish of the Nippon Ham Fighters.

What better way to make Darvish’s transition to American baseball smoother than by giving him another player on the roster to translate, room with and adapt to the major leagues. I could be reading too much into this but I do not see it as that far-fetched the Yankees might be thinking this way.

Darvish, 25, is a 6-foot-5, 187-pound right-hander who was 18-6 with a 1.44 ERA for the Ham Fighters in 2011. He also struck out 276 batters in 232 innings. Unlike countryman Daisuke Matzusaka, Darvish has a mid-90s fastball and he attacks the strike zone rather than relying on his breaking stuff to fool hitters into swinging at pitches out of the strike zone.

If Darvish is posted, as the owner of the Nippon franchise has promised Darvish he would, the Yankees could make an all-out effort to sign him.

The Yankees have had only lukewarm interest in Rangers left-hander C.J. Wilson, who is considered the top free-agent pitcher available this winter, because he is seeking $20 million per season. The Yankees believe Wilson projects as a No. 3 starter, at best, and they do not seem willing to invest that much money in him.

Darvish, however, could be a different story. The posting fee for him does not count against the payroll cap and Darvish is young enough that the Yankees could structure a long-term deal that would pay him considerably less than $20 million a season and scouts believe Darvish has a far superior upside than the 31-year-old Wilson.

So the bid for the rights to sign Nakajima may not seem so insignificant if you dig beneath the surface a bit.

Girardi, meanwhile, on Wednesday was making the case for the return of the Yankees’ two senior bench player sin 2011: Andruw Jones and Eric Chavez.

Girardi signaled to the players’ agents that the Yankees would be interested in keeping them both.

Jones, 33, played in the outfield and also was a part-time designated hitter. The right-handed hitting Jones batted .247 with 13 home runs and 33 RBIs in 77 games and hit .286 against left-handed pitching.

Chavez, 33, missed 2 1/2 months of the season with a fractured bone in his left foot and hit .263 with two home runs and 26 RBIs in 58 games. He started 33 games at third base, two first base and five at DH.

Girardi said with the veteran club the Yankees have, he would like to have Chavez and Jones back in order to give regular days off to his veteran starters, He was happy with what Jones and Chavez contributed to the club last season.

However, Cashman said the bench will have to take a back seat until the Yankees look at all their options with filling out their pitching needs this winter.

There is just one more day left for these meetings in Dallas. So far, it seems the Yankees have been one of the most obvious wallflowers in the grand ballroom. But sometimes the tempo needs to be set for the real dance to begin.

It looks like Cashman will be doing most of his waltzing in January.